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    Posted 2 weeks ago in Form 3

    Literature Analysis

    Critical thinking is the result of in depth reading and analysis. Discuss

      0       0

    Comments  


    Posted 3 weeks ago in Form 2

    Reading For Comprehension

    the longest word in english

      0       0

    Comments  


    Posted 1 month ago in Form 4

    Play of this time tomorrow

    what is the themes of three suitors one husband

      0       1

    Comments  


    Nabrics Hess   Posted on 4 weeks ago

    Bride price
    polygamy
    Food taboos
    Superstion
    Wife beating

    Posted 5 months ago in Form 2

    Listening To Various Simple Oral Texts

    How hard is maths

      0       4

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    yes true moukhatar ramadhan

    Boniphace Lenga   Posted on 3 months ago

    math depends on human IQ

    Kajol Abdulkarim   Posted on 4 months ago

    Math is not hard I love it

    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 4 months ago

    It depends on someone Brooooooooooo!

    Posted 5 months ago in Form 2

    0

    what are the aabriviation of noun

      1       1

    Comments  


    Petre Shelu   Posted on 2 months ago

    Nn

    Posted 7 months ago in Form 2

    Listening To Various Simple Oral Texts

    what is English

      1       5

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and eventually became a global lingua franca. It is named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Great Britain that later took their name, as England

    Boniphace Lenga   Posted on 3 months ago

    is the trade language which spoken all over the word to connect different kinds of people in order to make communication

    China Adidas   Posted on 4 months ago

    Hello my name is China how about you

    Charles Agustino   Posted on 5 months ago

    is the one of the languag spoken large in africa

    Posted 7 months ago in Form 4

    Expressing Oneself

    what is life

      0       3

    Comments  


    Gene Godwill   Posted on 3 days ago

    is the state of living which living things had before they die which non-living things do not have.

    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    the existence of an individual human being or animal.

    WILBARD JACOB   Posted on 5 months ago

    Life is a period between the birth date and death of a livingthings

    Posted 8 months ago in Form 3

    Literature Analysis

    What are the themes occurs in the play of this time tomorrow

      2       5

    Comments  


    Gibson Maduhu   Posted on 2 weeks ago

    Awareness, conflict betrayal colonial legacy and many others

    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    POVERTY,BETRAYAL,RACISM

    Joachim Kanoni   Posted on 2 months ago

    Poverty'love'tribalism

    Charlz Chinese   Posted on 8 months ago

    True love this are not themes 

    Posted 9 months ago in Form 4

    IBUN JAZARY SCHOOL

    What's the play's book

      0       0

    Comments  


    Posted 10 months ago in Form 1

    Bs

    What goes up when the rain comes down?

      0       4

    Comments  


    Charles Agustino   Posted on 5 months ago

    An umbrella

    Kagenorah Schubert   Posted on 6 months ago

    EVAPORATION

    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 8 months ago

    Moisture

    Leah Varsheter   Posted on 9 months ago

    rain

    Posted 10 months ago in Form 2

    Riddles

    There is a thing, when I take more of it , it becomes bigger 

    What is it?

      0       7

    Comments  


    Agnes Galomwa   Posted on 4 weeks ago

    give us the answer

    Exavery Witulo   Posted on 6 months ago

    work had to be nice in your life

    Exavery Witulo   Posted on 6 months ago

    english kwangu ni ngum nifanyaje

    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 10 months ago

    The answer iz 'HOLE' When u dig a hole, when u take more sand/soil,it becomes bigger

    Posted 10 months ago in Form 4

    Force marriage

             force marriage is where a person is force to get married without his/her willness .

      1       6

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    OK
    SO

    Charlz Chinese   Posted on 8 months ago

    In the play of this time tomorrow we can seen this unsure

    Ahlam Khalfan   Posted on 10 months ago

    This is English and u wrote civics question like shit

    Ahlam Khalfan   Posted on 10 months ago

    CHINTAL CAN I ASK U SOMERTHING

    Posted 11 months ago in Form 2

    ENGLISH VERBS

      0       3

    Comments  


    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 1 week ago

    Thank u 4 ur commitment

    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 8 months ago

    Thanks.Proud of u

    Jonathan Tafreg   Posted on 11 months ago

    SECTION II: VERB
    i. A word or phrase that describes an action, condition, or experience. E.g. Come, keep, feel, stop, be (am, is, was, were, been, being), drink, walk, go (went, gone, going, goes), run, eat, jump, do (did, done, doing, does), think, sing, cook, smile, laugh, cry, have, tremble, shake, study, read, write, listen, speak, call, summon, sweep, mop, cut, put, see, watch, catch, set etc.
    ii. A word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence, and forming the main part of the predicate of a sentence, such as run, become, or happen.
    iii. The word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence.
    iv. A content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence.
    v. One of the parts of speech, a word used to indicate the occurrence of or performance of an action or the existence of a state or condition, frequently connecting the subject of a sentence with the rest of the predicate. (Active verb, passive verb, auxiliary verb, compound verb, phrasal verb etc.)

    ? VERB CLASSIFICATION
    Verbs are divided into two broad classifications:
    i. Helping verb/auxiliary verb
    ii. Main verb/lexical verb

    ? HELPING VERBS
    Sometimes they are also called auxiliary verbs. They have no meaning on their own. They are necessary for the grammatical structure of a sentence, but they do not tell very much alone. Normally, helping verbs are used with main verbs, thus helping the main verb which has the real meaning. There are about fifteen (15) helping verbs in English, and they are divided into two (2) basic groups:

    • PRIMARY HELPING/AUXILIARY VERBS
    These are the verbs (be, do &have;). Sometimes these verbs can also be used as main verbs. As a helping verb, they are used in the following cases:

    HAVE
    - “Have” is a very important verb that can stand alone in all its tenses, including has, have, having, had, and hadn’t or had not. It is usually used to denote ownership, and it can also be used to discuss ability or describe appearance. “Have” is also a very popular substitute for the verbs “eat” and “drink.” For example: “Let’s have dinner.”
    When used as an auxiliary verb, have is always teamed up with another verb to create a complete verb phrase, making it easy to differentiate between uses. You can see the difference in the sentences below:
    - Jerry has a large coffee stain on his shirt. ? Has = action verb
    - Jerry has bought a new shirt to replace the one that was ruined earlier. ? Has = auxiliary verb; bought is a past participle that competes the verb phrase.
    - Jerry should have been more careful! ? Have = auxiliary verb; phrase “should have been” expresses time and evaluates Jerry’s actions.
    DO
    - “Do” can be used as an action verb that stands alone in all its tenses, including to do, do, does, done, did , didn’t or did not, and doesn’t.
    - When used as an auxiliary verb, do is always paired up with another verb to create a complete verb phrase. In some cases, it is used to add emphasis: “I did put the garbage out!” Do is often used to form questions and negated clauses. It is also used in elliptical sentences, where the main verb is understood and is omitted as a result. For example: “He plays piano well, doesn’t he?” or “They all had dinner, but I didn’t.”
    - Does = action verb ? because he spills things so often, Jerry does more laundry than most people.
    - Didn’t = auxiliary verb ? Jerry didn’t put his coffee in a cup with a lid.
    - Doesn’t = auxiliary verb ? Jerry doesn’t always spill things, but it happens a lot.

    BE
    - “Be” or “to be” is an important verb that has a multitude of uses in English. It can be used as an action verb that stands alone in all its tenses including be, to be, been, am, are, is, was, were, wasn’t, was not, aren’t, are not, weren’t and were not.
    - When used as an auxiliary verb, be is always paired with another verb to create a complete verb phrase. It can be singular or plural, present or past. Negative sentences are formed by adding the word “not”.
    - Is = action verb ? Jerry is messy.
    - Is = auxiliary verb ? although he is always complaining about his accidents, Jerry fails to pay attention.
    - To be = auxiliary verb ? Jerry is going to be doing extra laundry for the rest of his life.
    ? ‘Be’ is also used to make continuous tenses E.g. She is eating rice.
    ? And to make the passive. E.g. Small fish are eaten by big fish.

    NOTE:
    This primary auxiliary verb also functions as a linking verb. A linking verb does not have much meaning in itself. It ‘links’ the subject to what is said about the subject. Linking verbs connect the subject to a word or to a group of identities. They (i.e., am, is, are, was, were) describe the subject
    EXAMPLES:
    - Hassan is shy
    - The students are late,
    - I am sick.
    - Usually a linking verb shows equality (=) or a change to a different state or place (?). Linking verbs are always intransitive (but not all intransitive verbs are linking verbs).

    AUXILIARY VERB EXERCISES
    Fill in the blank with the correct auxiliary verb from the choices presented:
    1. What ________________ the kids doing when you last saw them? (was, were, are, did, been)
    2. Clara ________________ always wanted to try skydiving. (was, doesn’t, has, is, have)
    3. Where __________________ you go on your summer vacation? (were, been, are, did, does)
    4. Why do you think she __________ call you like she said she would? (didn’t, is, hasn’t, has been, have)
    5. Mary _____________ going to be upset when she hears what happened. (will, don’t, is, didn’t, has)
    6. Jeremy _____________ want to go to the movies; he wants to stay home instead. (doesn’t, isn’t, wasn’t, hasn’t, was not)
    7. I _________________ appreciate his jokes. They weren’t funny. (did, have, been, didn’t, haven’t)
    8. I really like fish but I _______________ care for meat. (weren’t, been, don’t, is, was)
    9. Where _____________ you going when I saw you last night? (were, was, is, do, did)
    10. Tara ________________ called yet; she’s late as usual. (are, were, has, hasn’t, wouldn’t)

    ? Answers: 1 – were, 2 – has, 3 – did, 4 – didn’t, 5 – is, 6 – doesn’t,
    7 – didn’t, 8 – don’t, 9 – were, 10 – hasn’t

    • MODAL HELPING/AUXILIARY VERBS
    Modals (also called modal verbs, modal auxiliary verbs, modal auxiliaries etc.) are special verbs which behave irregularly in English. They give additional information about the function of the main verb that follows it. They have a great variety of communicative functions. They have their distinctive characteristics which are:
    - They never change their form. You can’t add “s”, “ed”, “ing” etc.
    - They are used to modify the meaning of the main verb in some ways.
    - A modal helping verb expresses necessity or possibility, and changes the main verb in that sense.
    - In a general sense, modal verbs are the types of auxiliary verbs which express the mood of another verb.
    - They are used to indicate modality, and they allow speakers to express: possibility, willingness, certainty, prediction, speculation, permission, advice, probability, obligation, and necessity.
    - They do not have participle or infinitive forms, and do not take the ending – (e) s in the 3rd person singular.

    These are the modal helping verbs:
    - Can, Could, May, Might, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Ought to

    Examples:
    - I can’t speak Sukuma.
    - Would you like a glass of juice?
    - I really must go now.

    USAGE OF MODAL HELPING VERBS

    MODAL CONCEPT EXAMPLE
    • Can • Ability:
    • Permission:
    • Offers:
    • Possibility: -Adelina can swim.
    -Can I come with you?
    -Can I help you?
    -Smoking can cause cancer.
    • Could • Possibility:
    • Past ability:
    • Polite permission:
    • Request: -The story could be true.
    -John could swim when he was four years old.
    -Could I use your phone please?
    -Could you tell me the way to the station please?
    • May • Possibility:
    • Permission: -Director may come to our offices if the meeting finishes before 5pm.
    -May I borrow your dictionary?
    -May I come in?
    • Might • Slight possibility:
    • Past form of ‘May’ in reported speech. -We might win a prize but I doubt it.
    -The manager said he might come.
    • Must
    • Mustn’t/must not • Strong obligation:
    • Logical conclusion/certainty:
    • Prohibition: -Dogs must be kept on a lead.
    -You must be tired after your long journey.
    -You mustn’t tell my wife. It’s a surprise.
    -You must not smoke in the hospital.
    • Should • Advice:
    • Logical conclusion: -You should take an umbrella in case it rains.
    -I’ve revised so I should be ready for the test
    • Ought to/Should • 50% obligation:
    • Advice:
    • Logical conclusion: -I should/ought to see a doctor. I have a terrible headache.
    -You ought to write to your grandmother.
    -500Tshs ought to be enough for bodaboda.
    • Shall • Future tense auxiliary:
    • Offers/suggestions with ‘I’ and ‘we’ -I shall be in Mwanza on Monday
    -Shall we begin the meeting now?
    -Shall I begin?
    -Shall I order a taxi?
    • Will • Future tense auxiliary:
    • Invitations/offers:

    MORE ABOUT MODAL AND MODAL PHRASES (SEMI-MODALS)
    ? Modal phrases (or semi-modals) are used to express the same things as modals, but are a combination of auxiliary verbs and the preposition to

    ? CAN, COULD, BE ABLE TO
    Can, could and be able to are used to express a variety of ideas in English:
    • Ability/Lack of Ability
    Present and Future:
    ? Can/can’t + base form of the verb.
    - Tom can write poetry very well.
    - I can help you with that next week.
    - Lisa can’t speak French.

    ? Am / is / are / will be + able to + base form of the verb.
    ? Am not/ isn’t / aren’t/ won’t be + able to + base form of the verb.
    - Mike is able to solve complicated math equations.
    - The support team will be able to help you in about ten minutes.
    - I won’t be able to visit you next summer.
    Past:
    ? Could / couldn’t + base form of the verb.
    - When I was a child I could climb trees.
    ? Was / were + able to + base form of the verb.
    ? Wasn’t / weren’t + able to + base form of the verb.
    ? Hasn’t / haven’t + been able to + base form of the verb.
    - I wasn’t able to visit her in the hospital.
    - He hasn’t been able to get in touch with the client yet.
    ? Note: Can and could do not take an infinitive (to verb) and do not take the future auxiliary will.
    - Incorrect: I can to help you this afternoon.
    - Correct: I can help you this afternoon.
    - Correct: I will (I’ll) be able to help you this afternoon.

    • Possibility / Impossibility
    ? Can / can’t + base form of the verb.
    - You can catch that train at 10:43.
    - He can’t see you right now. He’s in surgery.
    ? Could + base form of the verb.
    - I could fly via Amsterdam if I leave the day before.

    • Ask permission / Give permission
    ? Can + Subject + base form of the verb (informal)
    - Can you lend me ten dollars?
    ? Can + base form of the verb (informal)
    - You can borrow my car.
    ? Could + subject + base form of the verb (polite)
    - Could I have your number?
    - Could I talk to your supervisor please?

    • Make a suggestion – To make a suggestion use:
    ? Could + base form of the verb (informal)
    - You could take the tour of the castle tomorrow.

    EXERCISES: CAN, COULD, BE ABLE TO
    Fill in the correct form of can, could or be able to as in the examples.
    1. Ben could not help his little brother with his homework yesterday.
    2. Can I call you later tonight?
    1. _______ Tony run long distances when he was a boy?
    2. ______ you please call a tow truck for me? My car broke down. (polite)
    3. The students _______ to buy their textbooks today. The bookstore is all out of them.
    4. ______ you teach me how to fix my computer? You’re so good at it.
    5. ______ you ______ reach the customer if you call him at 4:00 his time?

    ANSWERS:
    1. Could
    2. Could
    3. aren’t able
    4. Can
    5. Will/be able to

    ? MAY, MIGHT
    • Formal permission / Formal prohibition
    ? May / may not + base form of the verb.
    - You may start your exam now.
    - You may not wear sandals to work.

    • Polite request
    ? May + subject + base form of the verb.
    - May I help you?

    • Possibility / Negative possibility
    ? May/ might + base form of the verb.
    - We may go out dinner tonight. Do you want to join us?
    - Our company might get the order if the client agrees to the price.
    ? May not / might not + base form of the verb.
    - Adam and Sue may not buy that house. It’s very expensive.
    - They might not buy a house at all.

    • To make a suggestion (when there is no better alternative)
    ? May as well / might as well + base form of the verb.
    - You may as well come inside. John will be home soon.
    - We might as well take Friday off. There’s no work to be done anyway.

    • Polite suggestion
    ? Might + base form of the verb
    - You might like to try the salmon fillet. It’s our special today.

    EXERCISES: MAY / MIGHT
    Fill in the correct form of may or might as in the example.
    Example: May I sit here?
    1. They ______ finish the project on time. The main engineer is ill.
    2. You _____ want to stop by the museum gift shop on your way out.
    3. _____ I have your autograph?
    4. He _______ visit the Louvre. He’s in Paris anyway.
    5. You ______ park your car here. It’s reserved for guests of the hotel only.

    ANSWERS:
    1. might not
    2. might
    3. may
    4. may as well
    5. may not

    ? SHALL, SHOULD, OUGHT TO
    • To offer an assistance or polite suggestion (when you are quite sure of a positive answer)
    ? Shall + subject + base form of the verb
    - Shall we go for a walk?
    ? Note: Shall is only used with I or we. It is used instead of will only in formal English.

    • To offer an assistance or polite suggestion (when you are not sure of a positive answer)
    ? Should + subject + base form of the verb
    - Should I call a doctor?
    • A prediction or expectation that something will happen
    ? Should/shouldn’t + base form of the verb
    - The proposal should be finished on time.
    - I shouldn’t be late. The train usually arrives on time.

    • To give advice
    ? Should / ought to + base form of the verb
    - You should check that document before you send it out.
    - You ought to have your car serviced before the winter.

    • To give advice (about something you think wrong or unacceptable)
    ? Shouldn’t + base form of the verb
    - James shouldn’t teach him words like those.


    EXERCISES: SHOULD, SHOULDN’T, OUGHT TO
    - Fill in should, shouldn’t or ought in the following sentences as in the example.
    1. He shouldn’t encourage such bad behavior.
    1. You _____ get your teeth cleaned at least once a year.
    2. The house ______ be ready to move into by next month. It’s almost finished.
    3. Aaron ________ to improve his attitude. If he doesn’t, he might get fired.
    4. ________ I get your jacket? It’s cold in here.
    5. You ________ put your feet on the table. It’s not polite.

    ANSWERS:
    1. should
    2. should
    3. ought
    4. shall
    5. shouldn’t

    ? MUST, HAVE TO, NEED TO, DON’T HAVE TO, NEEDN’T
    • Necessity or Requirement
    Present and Future:
    ? Must / have to / need to + base form of the verb
    - You must have a passport to cross the border.
    - Elisabeth has to apply for her visa by March 10th.
    - I need to drop by his room to pick up a book.

    Past:
    Had to / needed to + base form of the verb.
    - I had to work late last night.
    - I needed to drink a few cups of coffee in order to stay awake.
    Note: have to and need toare often used in the same context, but many times, need to is used to express something that is less urgent, something in which you have a choice.

    • Almost 100% certain
    ? Must + base form of the verb
    - Thomas has lived in Paris for years. His French must be very good.

    • To persuade
    ? Must / have to + base form of the verb
    - You must try this wine. It’s excellent.
    - You have to visit us while you’re in town.

    • Prohibited or forbidden
    ? Must not / mustn’t + base form of the verb
    - You must not drive over the speed limit.
    - You mustn’t leave medicines where children can get to them.

    • Lack of necessity
    ? Don’t /doesn’t /didn’t + have to + base form of the verb
    - You don’t have to park the car. The hotel valet will do it for you.
    - Tim doesn’t have to go to school today. It’s a holiday.
    - You didn’t have to shout. Everyone could hear you.

    ? Needn’t + base form of the verb.
    - You needn’t worry about me. I’ll be fine.

    EXERCISES: MUST, HAVE TO, NEED TO, DON’T HAVE TO, NEEDN’T
    Fill in the blanks with one of these modals:
    Must, must not, have to, has to, don’t have to, doesn’t have to, needn’t as in the examples.
    Note:There may be more than one correct answer.
    - Sheila doesn’t have to drive to the airport. She’s going by taxi.
    - You must speak politely to the customers.

    1. You ______ tell Anna about the party tomorrow night. It’s a surprise! (must not, need to, doesn’t have to)
    2. Tina _______ register for her classes on Monday, otherwise she won’t get a place in them. (doesn’t have to, mustn’t, has to)
    3. You ________ send that fax. I’ve already sent it. (must, will have to, don’t have to)
    4. A dog ______ get special training in order to be a guide dog. (must, need to, don’t have to)
    5. Jeremy _______ get up early tomorrow. His class was cancelled. (mustn’t, doesn’t have to, don’t need to)



    ANSWERS:
    1. must not
    2. has to
    3. don’t have to
    4. must
    5. doesn’t have to

    ? MODALS: WILL / WOULD
    ? Will / won’t + base form of the verb.
    - John will pick you up at 7:00am.
    - Bethsheba won’t be happy with the results of the exam.

    • Polite request or statement
    ? Will / would + base form of the verb.
    - Will you please take the trash out?
    - Would you mind if I sat here?
    - I’d (I would) like to sign up for your workshop.

    • Habitual past action
    ? Would/Wouldn’t + base form of the verb
    - When I was a child, I would spend hours playing with my train set.
    - Peter wouldn’t eat broccoli when he was a kid. He loves it now.

    EXERCISES: WILL, WOULD
    Fill in the blanks with one of the following words: will, won’t, would, and wouldn’t.
    ? Example:Will you please help me lift this box?

    1. I ______ like to order the onion soup please.
    2. The manager _______ be pleased to hear that a customer slipped on the wet floor.
    3. _______ it be okay if I slept here tonight?
    4. When Igor lived in Russia, he ________ call his mother as often as he does now.
    5. I can assure you sir, the order ______ be shipped out tonight.




    ANSWERS:
    1. would
    2. won’t
    3. would
    4. wouldn’t
    5. will

    EXERCISES – ALL MODALS
    Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the following modals:
    can, could, be able to, may, might, shall, should, must, have to, don’t have to, need to
    – You may have to make the modals negative according to the context of the sentence.
    – There may be more than one possibility.
    Examples:
    - He has to take his car to be serviced. The brakes are squeaking.
    - Would you please save me a seat at the dinner event?

    1. If you are sick, you ________ go to work. You’ll infect everyone there.
    2. Drivers _______ stop at red lights.
    3. You _______ finish the proposal today. You can finish it tomorrow.
    4. She ______ hear much better with her new hearing aids.
    5. ______ I order us a bottle of wine?
    6. Sam ______ pick his daughter up from school. She’s taking the bus home.
    7. You _____________ smoke here. It’s a smoke-free building.
    8. You ________ eat so many sweets. They are bad for you.
    9. _________ you mind walking a little faster? We’re going to be late.
    10. I’m sorry. I _______ help you. I don’t know how to do it.

    ANSWERS:
    1. shouldn’t
    2. must
    3. don’t have to
    4. can
    5. shall
    6. needn’t
    7. mustn’t
    8. shouldn’t
    9. Would 10. Can’t

    ? USAGE OF SHALL & WILL
    There are traditional rules as to when to use shall and will. These state that, when forming the future tense, “shall” should be used with I and we, while will should be used with you, he, she, it and they. However, when expressing determination or a command, this rule is reversed: will is used with I and we, and shall is used with you, he, she, it and they. But in practice, these rules are not followed strictly. People instead use contracted forms E.g. she’ll, I’ll etc.

    ? MAIN VERBS
    Sometimes, they are called lexical verbs. The main verbs have their meaning on their own (unlike helping verbs). There are thousands of main verb, and we can classify them in several ways:

    1. ACTION OR DYNAMIC VERBS(physical & mental)
    Action Verbs are verbs that express action. The action can be physical or mental.
    - Physical: For instance: speak, carry, play, sleep etc. They are open, you can watch them. Their action can be measured, they are tangibles.
    - Mental: For instance: think, know, dream, reason, meditate etc. They are abstract, their action can’t be measured, and they are intangibles.

    - Most action verbs are defined as transitive or intransitive. This means that some are used with a direct object (the person or thing that receives the action of the subject) and others don’t need a direct object. Some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive depending on their meaning.

    (a) Transitive Verb
    A transitive verb takes a direct object: E.g. “somebody killed the president”. These verbs carry an object which is mostly a noun or a pronoun. They answer questions of “who?” and “what?”
    - I saw an elephant.
    - We are watchingTV.
    - He speaksEnglish.
    - She bought an orange.







    (b) Intransitive Verb
    An intransitive verb does not have a direct object: E.g. “He died”. These intransitive verbs don’t carry a direct object, but they carry indirect object which is not visible for example:
    - He has arrived.
    - She speaks fast.
    - Johnnie fell down.

    2. STATIVE VERBS
    What are Stative Verbs?
    - Stative verbs are verbs that express a state rather than an action. They usually relate to thoughts, emotions, relationships, senses, states of being and measurements. These verbs are not usually used with ing in progressive (continuous) tenses even though they may take on time expressions such as now and at the moment. We use the simple tenses for them.
    o Paul feels rotten today. He has a bad cold.
    o Do you recognize him? He is a famous rock star.
    o Our client appreciated all the work we did for him.
    LIST OF STATIVE VERBS
    Adore, agree, appear (seem), appreciate, be (exist), believe, belong to, concern, consist of, contain, cost, deny, depend on, deserve, detest, disagree, dislike, doubt, equal, feel, hate, have (possession), hear, imagine, include, involve, know, lack, like, loathe, look (seem), love, matter, mean, measure, mind, need, owe, own, possess, promise, realize, recognize, remember, resemble, satisfy, see, seem, smell, sound, suppose, surprise, taste, think (opinion), understand, want, weigh, wish
    STATIVE VERB EXERCISES
    Complete each sentence using the stative verb from the parenthesis:
    1. Do you _________ the answer? (depend on, know, include)
    2. Jim _________ dessert every day. (has, eats, possesses)
    3. I _________ good about the race’s outcome. (am, were, feel)
    4. She _________ her mother. (imagines, resembles, walks with)
    5. Do you _________ they will win? (think, involve, promise)
    6. They really _________ everything you did for them. (include, appreciate, dislike)
    7. I think the teacher was _________ with my speech. (involved, measured, satisfied)
    8. Can you _________ the coffee brewing? (feel, smell, dislike)
    9. I still _________ a lot of money on my student loans. (deserve, owe, involve)
    10. You _________ more shoes than anyone else I know! (dislike, suppose, have)

    - ANSWERS: 1 – know, 2 – has, 3 – feel, 4 – resembles, 5 – think,
    6 – appreciate, 7 – satisfied, 8 – smell, 9 – owe, 10 – have


    3. REGULAR AND IRREGULAR VERBS
    The only real difference between regular and irregular verbs is that, they have different endings for the past tense and past participle forms. For regular verbs, the past tense ending and past participle ending is always the same: (-d, -ed, -ied). For irregular verbs, the past tense ending is variable, so it is necessary to learn them by heart.

    - REGULAR VERBS: Examples
    Base Past tense Past participle
    Look looked looked
    Work worked worked
    Abandon abandoned abandoned
    Kill killed killed
    Terrify terrified terrified

    IRREGULAR VERBS
    What Are Irregular Verbs?
    - Irregular verbs are verbs that don’t take on the regular -d, -ed, or -ied spelling patterns of the past simple (V2) or past participle (V3). Many of the irregular V2 and V3 forms are the same, such as: cut – cut, had – had, let – let, hurt – hurt, fed- fed, sold-sold

    - IRREGULAR VERBS: Examples
    Base Past tense Past participle
    Buy bought bought
    See saw seen
    Say said said
    Think thought thought
    Take took taken
    Make made made
    Know knew known
    Cut cut cut
    Set set set
    Do did done
    Write wrote written
    Steal stole stolen
    Go went gone
    Arise arose arisen
    Break broke broken
    Give gave given
    Eat ate eaten
    Come came come
    Hide hid hidden
    Sing sang sung
    Swim swam swum
    Swing swung swung
    Sell sold sold
    Begin began begun
    †Bear bore Borne, born
    †Beget begot Begotten [archaic]
    Get got got (gotten: archaic or N. American.)

    NOTE:
    - Archaic (Adj.) 1. Of a word, language, etc.: no longer in ordinary use though retained by individuals or for special purpose (e.g. poetical, or liturgical). It also means an extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period of or belonging to the distant past; something from an ancient period in history.
    - Borne or born? When talking about mammals, use the past participle spelling “born” to talk about a person or animal’s birth (e.g. I was born in 1985). Use the spelling “borne” to talk about a mother giving birth to a child. E.g., she had borne three boys.








    IRREGULAR VERB EXERCISES
    Fill the blank spaces with the appropriate irregular verb.
    1. My dog jumped out of the swimming pool and _____________ himself, causing water to spray everywhere. (shake, shook, shaken)
    2. You should have ______________ Trish’s face when she got her surprise. (saw, had seen, seen)
    3. We _____________ the whole day lounging on the beach. (spend, spent, had spend)
    4. Let’s _____________ a hike on Saturday. (take, took, taken)
    5. My brother Mike ______________ his stinky socks on the coffee table. (leave, left, leaving)
    6. This is the ninth time that pitcher has _____________ a foul ball (throw, threw, thrown)
    7. The water balloon _____________ when it hit its target. (burst, busted, broken)
    8. Jesse intentionally ______________ gum in Jeff’s hair. (stick, stuck, sticky)

    - ANSWERS: 1 – shook, 2 – seen, 3 – spent, 4 – take, 5 – left, 6 – thrown, 7- burst, 8 – stuck

    ? PARTICIPLE(S)
    I. A word formed from a verb (e.g. going, gone, being, been) and used as an adjective or noun (as in burnt toast, good breeding) or used to make compound verb forms (is going, has been).
    II. A form of a verb, often ending in “-ed” or “-ing” and used with auxiliary verbs to make tenses, or to form adjectives.
    III. A non-finite form of a verb; in English it is used adjectivally to form compound tenses.
    IV. A non-finite part of a verb used with an auxiliary verb in expressing tense and voice, as in English (has) gone, (had been) kicked, (will be) working, and which may be used adjectivally.

    CATEGORIES
    I. Present participle:
    - A participle expressing present action; in English is formed by adding –ing.
    - A verb in the present tense which functions as a noun or adjective (ends in –ing).

    II. Past participle:
    - A participle that expresses completed action.

    III. Perfect participle:
    A participle that expresses completed action (like past participle).

    Posted 12 months ago in Form 3

    Geograp

    Wat is research??

      0       1

    Comments  


    Agnes Galomwa   Posted on 4 weeks ago

    u are wrong go in geo subject

    Posted 1 year ago in Form 1

    What is the meaning of population

    W

      1       3

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    A NUMBER OF PEPOLE IN A CERTAIN AREA

    Charles Agustino   Posted on 5 months ago

    is the larg number of people

    Kagenorah Schubert   Posted on 6 months ago

    IS A NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN A PARTICULAR AREA

    Posted 1 year ago in Form 4

    Are poet write activities which are relevant to other societies or universal

    i think poets explain their problems that hinder their society,but for some reason their uviversal

      0       1

    Comments  


    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 1 week ago

    can u put ur english properly , it sounds so weird

    Posted 1 year ago in Form 1

    What is plural of word ox ?


      0       11

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    OXEN

    Kagenorah Schubert   Posted on 6 months ago

    OXES

    Innocent Kiwelu   Posted on 10 months ago

    OXEN

    Aneth Mathew   Posted on 10 months ago

    Oxen

    Posted 1 year ago in Form 1

    Here we go

      0       0

    Comments  


    Posted 1 year ago in Form 1

    What is that?

    1.what is the name of a piece of sponge you take your head on it when you are sleeping?

    a)pillow
    b)river
    c)liver
    d)swallow 

      0       14

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    PILLOW

    Kagenorah Schubert   Posted on 6 months ago

    A PILLOW

    ADAM LUCAS   Posted on 10 months ago

    A

    Edson Kuzengwa   Posted on 11 months ago

    A

    Posted 1 year ago in Form 2

    STORY READING

    What are the benefits of it???

      2       4

    Comments  


    Ujwal Bhatia   Posted on 2 months ago

    KNOW OUR PAST

    Moukhtar Ramadhan   Posted on 4 months ago

    there are entertainment(including enjoying) ,getting educated, motivated,inspired,influenced so so and so

    Charles Agustino   Posted on 5 months ago

    to to have a high skills on leaning in places you occur to be

    Kagenorah Schubert   Posted on 6 months ago

    READING STORIES IMPACTS US TO HAVE GOOD READING LEVEL SKILLS NEEDED IN PLACES WE OCCUR TO BE

    Ask
    Ticha
    Kidevu